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    • Burton-Upon-Stather Primary
    • Flixborough Road
    • Burton-Upon-Stather
    • Scunthorpe
    • North Lincolnshire,DN15 9HB
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The National Curriculum and how we master it at Burton

Mastery Approach to Teaching and Learning

 

The mastery learning model forms the basis of our approach to teaching and learning at Burton upon Stather Primary. This means spending greater time going into depth about a subject as opposed to racing through the things that all children ‘should’ know. As a primary school, it is our duty to ensure that children have a concrete understanding of subject knowledge and skills taught as well as being emotionally resilient and ready for secondary school.

 

Now, we have the confidence to take learning at a steadier and deeper pace, ensuring children are not left behind, as well as providing deeper and richer experiences for children who are above the national expectation for their age.

 

We focus on allowing as many children as possible to achieve what is expected of their age group and not going beyond this. Evidence shows that children need to be able to understand a concept, apply it in a range of situations and then be creative to really understand it. Simply going beyond their age group does not guarantee they understand something at a ‘mastery’ level.

 

At our school no child will be taught content from the year group above them, they will spend time becoming true masters of content, applying and being creative with new knowledge and skills in multiple ways. 

 

In short, this means working towards:

  • Teach less, learn more: less teacher talk and more evidencing learning and progress
  • No child left behind*: all children are enabled to keep up every day
  • Space and time to experience and apply, with all children entitled to additional support to ensure they do not fall behind
  • Understanding real life applications wherever possible to make learning relevant and not abstract; nothing should be taught without a purpose

 

All of this means that you may see a change in the way we teach and assess your child, most notably will be in how we organise your child’s learning and how we report their progress to you.

 

We will be doing more of this:

  • Teaching all children together
  • Verbal feedback during lessons,
  • Spending longer on one idea,
  • Giving children who need it, additional support over shorter, more intense periods, like a day or week.
  • Pre-learning – groups of pupils being given a ‘leg up’ by carrying out preliminary learning that will help them to access the contents of the next teaching sequence and prevent them falling behind.
  • Top–up sessions – groups of pupils that are in danger of falling behind will have sessions provided by the teacher or a teaching assistant to consolidate new concepts.

 

This approach is seen as best practice.  It is promoted by the government and seen as the best way to deliver the new, more challenging national curriculum.

 

NB* We are a fully inclusive school and ensure that all pupils are making progress but we are aware that for some pupils with SEND requirements, the amount of effort put in is just as important as the academic standards reached. We consider meaningful ways of measuring all aspects of progress including communication, social skills, physical development, resilience and independence.

 

A Guide for Parents

 

The Curriculum at Burton upon Stather Primary School

The National Curriculum in England is currently in a process of transition. During the course of the previous academic year (2013-2014) the obligation to teach programmes of study from the previous National Curriculum were disapplied and new programmes of study and attainment targets were put in place.

 

Why the big curriculum change?

The main aim is to raise standards. Although the new curriculum is intended to be more challenging, the content is actually slimmer than the current curriculum, focusing on essential core subject knowledge and skills such as essay writing and computer programming.

 

The main changes.

The table below summarises the main changes in the core subjects.

Subject

What’s new?

English

  • Stronger emphasis on vocabulary development, grammar, punctuation and spelling (for example, the use of commas and apostrophes will be taught in KS1)
  • Handwriting( not currently assessed under the national curriculum) is expected to be fluent, legible and speedy
  • Spoken English has a greater emphasis, with children to be taught debating and presenting skills.

Maths

  • Five-year-olds will be expected to learn to count up to 100 (compared to 20 under the current curriculum) and learn number bonds to 20 (currently up to 10)
  • Simple fractions (1/4 and 1/2) will be taught from KS1, and by the end of primary school, children should be able to convert decimal fractions to simple fractions (e.g. 0.375 = 3/8)
  • By the age of nine, children will be expected to know times tables up to 12×12 (currently 10×10 by the end of primary school)
  • Calculators will not be introduced until near the end of KS2, to encourage mental arithmetic.

Science

  • Strong focus on scientific knowledge and language, rather than understanding the nature and methods of science in abstract terms
  • Evolution will be taught in primary schools for the first time
  • Non-core subjects like caring for animals will be replaced by topics like the human circulatory system

Design & technology

  • Design and Technology has become more important in the new curriculum, setting children on the path to becoming the designers and engineers of the future
  • More sophisticated use of design equipment such as electronics and robotics
  • In KS2, children will learn about how key events and individuals in design and technology have shaped the world.

ICT

  • Computing replaces Information and Communication Technology (ICT), with a greater focus on programming rather than on operating programs
  • From age five, children will learn to write and test simple programs, and to organise, store and retrieve data
  • From seven, they will be taught to understand computer networks, including the internet
  • Internet safety – currently only taught from 11-16 – will be taught in primary schools

Languages

  • Previously not statutory, a modern foreign language  will be mandatory in KS2. Children will be expected to master basic grammar and accurate pronunciation and to converse, present, read and write in the language
  •  

 

 

In order to prepare pupils for the more ambitious end of year expectations in English, Mathematics and Science, as set out in the new curriculum, teachers have amended their delivery of the programmes of study detailed above as appropriate. New programmes of study for English and Mathematics have been adopted in full from September 2014, in line with guidance from the Department of Education and our creative curriculum has been fully updated to account for these changes. New maths resources have arrived at school and a new English programme has been adopted from September to take account of these changes.
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