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Science and Technology

Science

The principal focus of science teaching in key stage 1 is to enable pupils to experience and observe phenomena, looking more closely at the natural and humanly-constructed world around them. They should be encouraged to be curious and ask questions about what they notice. They should be helped to develop their understanding of scientific ideas by using different types of scientific enquiry to answer their own questions, including observing changes over a period of time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out simple comparative tests, and finding things out using secondary sources of information. They should begin to use simple scientific language to talk about what they have found out and communicate their ideas to a range of audiences in a variety of ways. Most of the learning about science should be done through the use of first-hand practical experiences, but there should also be some use of appropriate secondary sources, such as books, photographs and videos. 

 

In Years 1 and 2 topics include 'Paws, Claws and Whiskers', Dinosaur Planet', 'The Enchanted Woodland', 'The Scented Garden' and 'Moon Zoom'. 

Pupils should read and spell scientific vocabulary at a level consistent with their increasing word reading and spelling knowledge at key stage 1. 

 

During years 1 and 2, pupils should be taught to use the following practical scientific methods, processes and skills through the teaching of the programme of study content:

  • asking simple questions and recognising that they can be answered in different ways 
  • observing closely, using simple equipment 
  • performing simple tests
  • identifying and classifying 
  • using their observations and ideas to suggest answers to questions  gathering and recording data to help in answering questions. 

 

The principal focus of science teaching in lower key stage 2 is to enable pupils to broaden their scientific view of the world around them. They should do this through exploring, talking about, testing and developing ideas about everyday phenomena and the relationships between living things and familiar environments, and by beginning to develop their ideas about functions, relationships and interactions. They should ask their own questions about what they observe and make some decisions about which types of scientific enquiry are likely to be the best ways of answering them, including observing changes over time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out simple comparative and fair tests and finding things out using secondary sources of information. They should draw simple conclusions and use some scientific language, first, to talk about and, later, to write about what they have found out. 

 

In Years 3 and 4 topics include 'Misty Mountains', 'Burps, Bottoms and Bile', 'Blue Abyss' and 'Scrumdidliumptious'.

 

During Years 3 and 4, pupils should be taught to use the following practical scientific methods, processes and skills through the teaching of the programme of study content:

  •   asking relevant questions and using different types of scientific enquiries to answer them

  •   setting up simple practical enquiries, comparative and fair tests

  •   making systematic and careful observations and, where appropriate, taking accurate measurements using standard units, using a range of equipment, including thermometers and data loggers

  •   gathering, recording, classifying and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions

  •   recording findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, keys, bar charts, and tables

  •   reporting on findings from enquiries, including oral and written explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusions

  •   using results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions

  •   identifying differences, similarities or changes related to simple scientific ideas and processes

  •   using straightforward scientific evidence to answer questions or to support their findings. 

 

The principal focus of science teaching in upper key stage 2 is to enable pupils to develop a deeper understanding of a wide range of scientific ideas. They should do this through exploring and talking about their ideas; asking their own questions about scientific phenomena; and analysing functions, relationships and interactions more systematically. At upper key stage 2, they should encounter more abstract ideas and begin to recognise how these ideas help them to understand and predict how the world operates. They should also begin to recognise that scientific ideas change and develop over time. They should select the most appropriate ways to answer science questions using different types of scientific enquiry, including observing changes over different periods of time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out comparative and fair tests and finding things out using a wide range of secondary sources of information. Pupils should draw conclusions based on their data and observations, use evidence to justify their ideas, and use their scientific knowledge and understanding to explain their findings. 

 

In Years 5 and 6 topics include ' Star Gazers'. ' Beats Creator', ' Blood Heart', ' Darwin's Delights', 'Allotment' and 'ID'.

 

Technology

 

Key stage 1

Through a variety of creative and practical activities, pupils are taught the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in an iterative process of designing and making. They work in a range of relevant contexts (for example, the home and school, gardens and playgrounds, the local community, industry and the wider environment).

 

When designing and making, pupils are taught to:

Design

  •   design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria

  •   generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology

  • Make

  •   select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing]

  •   select from and use a wide range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their characteristics

    Evaluate

     explore and evaluate a range of existing products
     evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria

    Technical knowledge

  •   build structures, exploring how they can be made stronger, stiffer and more stable

  •   explore and use mechanisms [for example, levers, sliders, wheels and axles], in their

    products. 

 

 

Key stage 2

Through a variety of creative and practical activities, pupils should be taught the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in an iterative process of designing and making. They should work in a range of relevant contexts [for example, the home, school, leisure, culture, enterprise, industry and the wider environment].

When designing and making, pupils should be taught to:

Design

  •   use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups

  •   generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design

    Make

    •   select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing], accurately

    •   select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities

      Evaluate

    •   investigate and analyse a range of existing products

    •   evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the

      views of others to improve their work

    •   understand how key events and individuals in design and technology have helped shape the world

      Technical knowledge

  •   apply their understanding of how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce more complex structures

  •   understand and use mechanical systems in their products [for example, gears, pulleys, cams, levers and linkages]

  •   understand and use electrical systems in their products [for example, series circuits incorporating switches, bulbs, buzzers and motors]

  •   apply their understanding of computing to program, monitor and control their products. 

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